Possible victim of Bitcoin Botnet - Virus, Trojan, Spyware

What Is The Dark Web? How Can You Access It? What Will You Find?

What Is The Dark Web? How Can You Access It? What Will You Find?

Dark Net Hacker
DarkNetHacker.net
What is the dark web? How to access it and what you'll find
The dark web is part of the internet that isn't visible to search engines and requires the use of an anonymizing browser called Tor to be accessed.
Dark web definition
The dark web is a part of the internet that isn't indexed by search engines. You've no doubt heard talk of the “dark web” as a hotbed of criminal activity — and it is. Researchers Daniel Moore and Thomas Rid of King's College in London classified the contents of 2,723 live dark web sites over a five-week period in 2015 and found that 57% host illicit material.

A 2019 study, Into the Web of Profit, conducted by Dr. Michael McGuires at the University of Surrey, shows that things have become worse. The number of dark web listings that could harm an enterprise has risen by 20% since 2016. Of all listings (excluding those selling drugs), 60% could potentially harm enterprises.

You can buy credit card numbers, all manner of drugs, guns, counterfeit money, stolen subscription credentials, hacked Netflix accounts and software that helps you break into other people’s computers. Buy login credentials to a $50,000 Bank of America account for $500. Get $3,000 in counterfeit $20 bills for $600. Buy seven prepaid debit cards, each with a $2,500 balance, for $500 (express shipping included). A “lifetime” Netflix premium account goes for $6. You can hire hackers to attack computers for you. You can buy usernames and passwords.

But not everything is illegal, the dark web also has a legitimate side. For example, you can join a chess club or BlackBook, a social network described as the “the Facebook of Tor.”


Note: This post contains links to dark web sites that can only be accessed with the Tor browser, which can be downloaded for free at https://www.torproject.org.

Deep web vs. dark web: What’s the difference?
The terms “deep web” and “dark web” are sometimes used interchangeably, but they are not the same. Deep web refers to anything on the internet that is not indexed by and, therefore, accessible via a search engine like Google. Deep web content includes anything behind a paywall or requires sign-in credentials. It also includes any content that its owners have blocked web crawlers from indexing.

Medical records, fee-based content, membership websites, and confidential corporate web pages are just a few examples of what makes up the deep web. Estimates place the size of the deep web at between 96% and 99% of the internet. Only a tiny portion of the internet is accessible through a standard web browser—generally known as the “clear web”.

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The dark web is a subset of the deep web that is intentionally hidden, requiring a specific browser—Tor—to access, as explained below. No one really knows the size of the dark web, but most estimates put it at around 5% of the total internet. Again, not all the dark web is used for illicit purposes despite its ominous-sounding name.


Dark web tools and services that present enterprise risk
The Into the Web of Profit report identified 12 categories of tools or services that could present a risk in the form of a network breach or data compromise:

Infection or attacks, including malware, distributed denial of service (DDoS) and botnets
Access, including remote access Trojans (RATs), keyloggers and exploits
Espionage, including services, customization and targeting
Support services such as tutorials
Credentials
Phishing
Refunds
Customer data
Operational data
Financial data
Intellectual property/trade secrets
Other emerging threats
The report also outlined three risk variables for each category:

Devaluing the enterprise, which could include undermining brand trust, reputational damage or losing ground to a competitor
Disrupting the enterprise, which could include DDoS attacks or other malware that affects business operations
Defrauding the enterprise, which could include IP theft or espionage that impairs a company's ability to compete or causes a direct financial loss
Dark web browser
All this activity, this vision of a bustling marketplace, might make you think that navigating the dark web is easy. It isn’t. The place is as messy and chaotic as you would expect when everyone is anonymous, and a substantial minority are out to scam others.

Accessing the dark web requires the use of an anonymizing browser called Tor. The Tor browser routes your web page requests through a series of proxy servers operated by thousands of volunteers around the globe, rendering your IP address unidentifiable and untraceable. Tor works like magic, but the result is an experience that’s like the dark web itself: unpredictable, unreliable and maddeningly slow.

[ Is your data being sold? What you need to know about monitoring the dark web. | Get the latest from CSO by signing up for our newsletters. ]

Still, for those willing to put up with the inconvenience, the dark web provides a memorable glimpse at the seamy underbelly of the human experience – without the risk of skulking around in a dark alley.

Dark web search engine
Dark web search engines exist, but even the best are challenged to keep up with the constantly shifting landscape. The experience is reminiscent of searching the web in the late 1990s. Even one of the best search engines, called Grams, returns results that are repetitive and often irrelevant to the query. Link lists like The Hidden Wiki are another option, but even indices also return a frustrating number of timed-out connections and 404 errors.

Dark web sites
Dark web sites look pretty much like any other site, but there are important differences. One is the naming structure. Instead of ending in .com or .co, dark web sites end in .onion. That’s “a special-use top level domain suffix designating an anonymous hidden service reachable via the Tor network,” according to Wikipedia. Browsers with the appropriate proxy can reach these sites, but others can’t.

Dark web sites also use a scrambled naming structure that creates URLs that are often impossible to remember. For example, a popular commerce site called Dream Market goes by the unintelligible address of “eajwlvm3z2lcca76.onion.”

Many dark websites are set up by scammers, who constantly move around to avoid the wrath of their victims. Even commerce sites that may have existed for a year or more can suddenly disappear if the owners decide to cash in and flee with the escrow money they’re holding on behalf of customers.

Law enforcement officials are getting better at finding and prosecuting owners of sites that sell illicit goods and services. In the summer of 2017, a team of cyber cops from three countries successfully shut down AlphaBay, the dark web’s largest source of contraband, sending shudders throughout the network. But many merchants simply migrated elsewhere.

The anonymous nature of the Tor network also makes it especially vulnerable to DDoS, said Patrick Tiquet, Director of Security & Architecture at Keeper Security, and the company’s resident expert on the topic. “Sites are constantly changing addresses to avoid DDoS, which makes for a very dynamic environment,” he said. As a result, “The quality of search varies widely, and a lot of material is outdated.”

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Commerce on the dark web
The dark web has flourished thanks to bitcoin, the crypto-currency that enables two parties to conduct a trusted transaction without knowing each other’s identity. “Bitcoin has been a major factor in the growth of the dark web, and the dark web has been a big factor in the growth of bitcoin,” says Tiquet.

Nearly all dark web commerce sites conduct transactions in bitcoin or some variant, but that doesn’t mean it’s safe to do business there. The inherent anonymity of the place attracts scammers and thieves, but what do you expect when buying guns or drugs is your objective?

Dark web commerce sites have the same features as any e-retail operation, including ratings/reviews, shopping carts and forums, but there are important differences. One is quality control. When both buyers and sellers are anonymous, the credibility of any ratings system is dubious. Ratings are easily manipulated, and even sellers with long track records have been known to suddenly disappear with their customers’ crypto-coins, only to set up shop later under a different alias.

Most e-commerce providers offer some kind of escrow service that keeps customer funds on hold until the product has been delivered. However, in the event of a dispute don’t expect service with a smile. It’s pretty much up to the buyer and the seller to duke it out. Every communication is encrypted, so even the simplest transaction requires a PGP key.

Even completing a transaction is no guarantee that the goods will arrive. Many need to cross international borders, and customs officials are cracking down on suspicious packages. The dark web news site Deep.Dot.Web teems with stories of buyers who have been arrested or jailed for attempted purchases.

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Is the dark web illegal?
We don’t want to leave you with the impression that everything on the dark web is nefarious or illegal. The Tor network began as an anonymous communications channel, and it still serves a valuable purpose in helping people communicate in environments that are hostile to free speech. “A lot of people use it in countries where there’s eavesdropping or where internet access is criminalized,” Tiquet said.

If you want to learn all about privacy protection or cryptocurrency, the dark web has plenty to offer. There are a variety of private and encrypted email services, instructions for installing an anonymous operating system and advanced tips for the privacy-conscious.

There’s also material that you wouldn’t be surprised to find on the public web, such as links to full-text editions of hard-to-find books, collections of political news from mainstream websites and a guide to the steam tunnels under the Virginia Tech campus. You can conduct discussions about current events anonymously on Intel Exchange. There are several whistleblower sites, including a dark web version of Wikileaks. Pirate Bay, a BitTorrent site that law enforcement officials have repeatedly shut down, is alive and well there. Even Facebook has a dark web presence.

“More and more legitimate web companies are starting to have presences there,” Tiquet said. “It shows that they’re aware, they’re cutting edge and in the know.”

There’s also plenty of practical value for some organizations. Law enforcement agencies keep an ear to the ground on the dark web looking for stolen data from recent security breaches that might lead to a trail to the perpetrators. Many mainstream media organizations monitor whistleblower sites looking for news.

Staying on top of the hacker underground
Keeper’s Patrick Tiquet checks in regularly because it’s important for him to be on top of what’s happening in the hacker underground. “I use the dark web for situational awareness, threat analysis and keeping an eye on what’s going on,” he said will. “I want to know what information is available and have an external lens into the digital assets that are being monetized – this gives us insight on what hackers are targeting.”

If you find your own information on the dark web, there’s precious little you can do about it, but at least you’ll know you’ve been compromised. Bottom line: If you can tolerate the lousy performance, unpredictable availability, and occasional shock factor of the dark web, it’s worth a visit. Just don’t buy anything there.
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ColossusXT Q2 AMA Ends!

Thank you for being a part of the ColossusXT Reddit AMA! Below we will summarize the questions and answers. The team responded to 78 questions! If you question was not included, it may have been answered in a previous question. The ColossusXT team will do a Reddit AMA at the end of every quarter.
The winner of the Q2 AMA Contest is: Shenbatu
Q: Why does your blockchain exist and what makes it unique?
A: ColossusXT exists to provide an energy efficient method of supercomputing. ColossusXT is unique in many ways. Some coins have 1 layer of privacy. ColossusXT and the Colossus Grid will utilize 2 layers of privacy through Obfuscation Zerocoin Protocol, and I2P and these will protect users of the Colossus Grid as they utilize grid resources. There are also Masternodes and Proof of Stake which both can contribute to reducing 51% attacks, along with instant transactions and zero-fee transactions. This protection is paramount as ColossusXT evolves into the Colossus Grid. Grid Computing will have a pivotal role throughout the world, and what this means is that users will begin to experience the Internet as a seamless computational universe. Software applications, databases, sensors, video and audio streams-all will be reborn as services that live in cyberspace, assembling and reassembling themselves on the fly to meet the tasks at hand. Once plugged into the grid, a desktop machine will draw computational horsepower from all the other computers on the grid.
Q: What is the Colossus Grid?
A: ColossusXT is an anonymous blockchain through obfuscation, Zerocoin Protocol, along with utilization of I2P. These features will protect end user privacy as ColossusXT evolves into the Colossus Grid. The Colossus Grid will connect devices in a peer-to-peer network enabling users and applications to rent the cycles and storage of other users’ machines. This marketplace of computing power and storage will exclusively run on COLX currency. These resources will be used to complete tasks requiring any amount of computation time and capacity, or allow end users to store data anonymously across the COLX decentralized network. Today, such resources are supplied by entities such as centralized cloud providers which are constrained by closed networks, proprietary payment systems, and hard-coded provisioning operations. Any user ranging from a single PC owner to a large data center can share resources through Colossus Grid and get paid in COLX for their contributions. Renters of computing power or storage space, on the other hand, may do so at low prices compared to the usual market prices because they are only using resources that already exist.
Q: When will zerocoin be fully integrated?
A: Beta has been released for community testing on Test-Net. As soon as all the developers consider the code ready for Main-Net, it will be released. Testing of the code on a larger test network network will ensure a smooth transition.
Q: Is the end goal for the Colossus Grid to act as a decentralized cloud service, a resource pool for COLX users, or something else?
A: Colossus Grid will act as a grid computing resource pool for any user running a COLX node. How and why we apply the grid to solve world problems will be an ever evolving story.
Q: What do you think the marketing role in colx.? When ll be the inwallet shared nodes available...i know its been stated in roadmap but as u dont follow roadmap and offer everything in advance...i hope shared MN's to be avilable soon.
A: The ColossusXT (COLX) roadmap is a fluid design philosophy. As the project evolves, and our community grows. Our goal is to deliver a working product to the market while at the same time adding useful features for the community to thrive on, perhaps the Colossus Grid and Shared Masternodes will be available both by the end of Q4 2018.
Q: When will your github be open to the public?
A: The GitHub has been open to the public for a few months now.
You can view the GitHub here: https://github.com/ColossusCoinXT
The latest commits here: https://github.com/ColossusCoinXT/ColossusCoinXT/commits/master
Q: Why should I use COLX instead of Monero?
A: ColossusXT offers Proof of Stake and Masternodes both which contribute layers in protection from 51% attacks often attributed with Proof of Work consensus, and in being Proof of Work(Monero) ColossusXT is environmentally friendly compared to Proof of Work (Monero). You can generate passive income from Proof of Stake, and Masternodes. Along with helping secure the network.What really sets ColossusXT apart from Monero, and many other privacy projects being worked on right now, is the Colossus Grid. Once plugged into the Colossus Grid, a desktop machine will draw computational horsepower from all the other computers on the grid. Blockchain, was built on the core value of decentralization and ColossusXT adhere to these standards with end-user privacy in mind in the technology sector.
Q: With so many coins out with little to no purpose let alone a definitive use case, how will COLX distinguish itself from the crowd?
A: You are right, there are thousands of other coins. Many have no purpose, and we will see others “pumping” from day to day. It is the nature of markets, and crypto as groups move from coin to coin to make a quick profit. As blockchain regulations and information is made more easily digestible projects like ColossusXT will rise. Our goal is to produce a quality product that will be used globally to solve technical problems, in doing so grid computing on the ColossusXT network could create markets of its own within utilizing Super-computing resources. ColossusXT is more than just a currency, and our steadfast approach to producing technical accomplishments will not go unnoticed.
Q: Tell the crowd something about the I2P integration plan in the roadmap? 🙂
A: ColossusXT will be moving up the I2P network layer in the roadmap to meet a quicker development pace of the Colossus Grid. The I2P layer will serve as an abstraction layer further obfuscating the users of ColossusXT (COLX) nodes. Abstraction layer allows two parties to communicate in an anonymous manner. This network is optimised for anonymous file-sharing.
Q: What kind of protocols, if any, are being considered to prevent or punish misuse of Colossus Grid resources by bad actors, such as participation in a botnet/denial of service attack or the storage of stolen information across the Grid?
A: What defines bad actors? ColossusXT plans on marketing to governments and cyber security companies globally. Entities and individuals who will certainly want their privacy protected. There is a grey area between good and bad, and that is something we can certainly explore as a community. Did you have any ideas to contribute to this evolving variable?What we mean when we say marketing towards security companies and governments is being utilized for some of the projects and innovating new ways of grid computing.
Security: https://wiki.ncsa.illinois.edu/display/cybersec/Projects+and+Software
Governments: https://www.techwalla.com/articles/what-are-the-uses-of-a-supercomputer
Q: The Colossus Grid is well defined but I don't feel easily digestible. Has their been any talk of developing an easier to understand marketing plan to help broaden the investoadoptor base?
A: As we get closer to the release of the Colossus Grid marketing increase for the Colossus Grid. It will have a user friendly UI, and we will provide Guides and FAQ’s with the release that any user intending to share computing power will be able to comprehend.
Q: Can you compare CollossusXT and Golem?
A: Yes. The Colosssus Grid is similar to other grid computing projects. The difference is that ColossusXT is on it’s own blockchain, and does not rely on the speed or congestion of a 3rd party blockchain. The Colossus Grid has a privacy focus and will market to companies, and individuals who would like to be more discreet when buying or selling resources by offering multiple levels of privacy protections.
Q: How do you guys want to achieve to be one of the leaders as a privacy coin?
A: Being a privacy coin leader is not our end game. Privacy features are just a small portion of our framework. The Colossus Grid will include privacy features, but a decentralized Supercomputer is what will set us apart and we intend to be leading this industry in the coming years as our vision, and development continue to grow and scale with technology.
Q: With multiple coins within this space, data storage and privacy, how do you plan to differentiate COLX from the rest? Any further partnerships planned?
A: The Colossus Grid will differentiate ColossusXT from coins within the privacy space. The ColossusXT blockchain will differentiate us from the DATA storage space. Combining these two features with the ability to buy and sell computing power to complete different computational tasks through a decentralized marketplace. We intend to involve more businesses and individuals within the community and will invite many companies to join in connecting the grid to utilize shared resources and reduce energy waste globally when the BETA is available.
Q: Has colossus grid had the best come up out of all crypto coins?
A: Possibly. ColossusXT will continue to “come up” as we approach the launch of the Colossus Grid network.
Q: How far have Colossus gone in the ATM integration
A: ColossusXT intends to and will play an important role in the mass adoption of cryptocurrencies. We already have an ongoing partnership with PolisPay which will enable use of COLX via master debit cards. Along with this established relationship, ColossusXT team is in touch with possible companies to use colx widely where these can only be disclosed upon mutual agreement.
Q: How does COLX intend to disrupt the computing industry through Grid Computing?
A: Using the Colossus Grid on the ColossusXT blockchain, strengthens the network. Computers sit idly by for huge portions of the day. Connecting to the Colossus Grid and contributing those idle resources can make use of all the computing power going to waste, and assist in advancing multiple technology sectors and solving issues. Reducing costs, waste, and increased speed in technology sectors such as scientific research, machine learning, cyber security, and making it possible for anyone with a desktop PC to contribute resources to the Colossus Grid and earn passive income.
Q: What kind of partnerships do you have planned and can you share any of them? :)
A: The ColossusXT team will announce partnerships when they are available. It’s important to finalize all information and create strong avenues of communication between partners ColossusXT works with in the future. We are currently speaking with many different exchanges, merchants, and discussing options within our technology sector for utilizing the Colossus Grid.
Q: Will shared Masternodes be offered by the COLX team? Or will there be any partnerships with something like StakingLab, StakeUnited, or SimplePosPool? StakingLab allows investors of any size to join their shared Masternodes, so any investor of any size can join. Is this a possibility in the future?
A: ColossusXT has already partnered with StakingLab. We also plan to implement shared Masternodes in the desktop wallet.
Q: How innovative is the Colossus Grid in the privacy coin space?
A: Most privacy coins are focused on being just a currency / form of payment. No other project is attempting to do what we are doing with a focus on user privacy.
Q: Hey guys do you think to integrated with some other plataforms like Bancor? I would like it!
A: ColossusXT is in touch with many exchange platforms, however, due to non disclosure agreements details cannot be shared until it is mutually decided with the partners. We will always be looking for new platforms to spread the use of colx in different parts of the world and crypto space.
Q: What is the reward system for the master node owners?
A: From block 388.800 onwards, block reward is 1200 colx and this is split based on masternode ownestaker ratio. This split is based on see-saw algorithm. With an increasing number of masternodes the see-saw algorithm disincentivizes the establishment of even more masternodes because it lowers their profitability. To be precise, as soon as more than 41.5% of the total COLX coin supply is locked in masternodes, more than 50% of the block reward will be distributed to regular staking nodes. As long as the amount of locked collateral funds is below the threshold of 41.5%, the see-saw algorithm ensure that running a masternode is financially more attractive than running a simple staking node, to compensate for the additional effort that a masternode requires in comparison to a simple staking node.Please refer to our whitepaper for more information.
Q: What other marketplaces has the COLX team been in contact with?
Thanks guys! Love the coin and staff
A: ColossusXT gets in touch for different platforms based on community request and also based on partnership requests received upon ColossusXT business team’s mutual agreement. Unfortunately, these possibilities cannot be shared until they are mutually agreed between the partners and ColossusXT team due to non disclosure agreements.
Q: What do you think about the new rules that will soon govern crypto interactions in the EU? they are against anonymous payments
A: Blockchain technology is just now starting to become clear to different governments.
ColossusXT's privacy features protect the end-user from oversharing personal information. As you are probably aware from the multiple emails you've received recently from many websites.
Privacy policies are always being updated and expanded upon. The use of privacy features with utility coins like ColossusXT should be a regular norm throughout blockchain. This movement is part is about decentralization as much as it is about improving technology.
While this news may have a role to play. I don't think it is THE role that will continuously be played as blockchain technology is implemented throughout the world.
Q: Any hints on the next big feature implementation you guys are working on? According to road map - really excited to hear more about the Shared MN and the scale of the marketplace!
A: Current work is focused on the privacy layer of Colossus Grid and completing the updated wallet interface.
Q: Why choose COLX, or should I say why should we believe in COLX becoming what you promise in the roadmap. What are you different from all the other privacy coins with block chain establishment already in effect?
A: ColossusXT is an environmentally friendly Proof of Stake, with Masternode technology that provide dual layers of protection from 51% attacks. It includes privacy features that protect the user while the utilize resources from the Colossus Grid. Some of the previous questions within this AMA may also answer this question.
Q: What tradeoffs do you have using the Colossus Grid versus the more typical distribution?
A: The advantage of supercomputers is that since data can move between processors rapidly, all of the processors can work together on the same tasks. Supercomputers are suited for highly-complex, real-time applications and simulations. However, supercomputers are very expensive to build and maintain, as they consist of a large array of top-of-the-line processors, fast memory, custom hardware, and expensive cooling systems. They also do not scale well, since their complexity makes it difficult to easily add more processors to such a precisely designed and finely tuned system.By contrast, the advantage of distributed systems (Like Colossus Grid) is that relative to supercomputers they are much less expensive. Many distributed systems make use of cheap, off-the-shelf computers for processors and memory, which only require minimal cooling costs. In addition, they are simpler to scale, as adding an additional processor to the system often consists of little more than connecting it to the network. However, unlike supercomputers, which send data short distances via sophisticated and highly optimized connections, distributed systems must move data from processor to processor over slower networks making them unsuitable for many real-time applications.
Q: Why should I choose Colossus instead of another 100,000 altcoins?
A: Many of these alt-coins are all very different projects. ColossusXT is the only Grid computing project with a focus on user privacy. We have instant transactions, and zero-fee transactions and ColossusXT is one of the very few coins to offer live support. Check out our Whitepaper!
Q: Will there be an option (in the future) to choose between an anonymous or public transaction?
A: Zerocoin is an evolution of the current coin mixing feature. Both allow an individual to decide how they would like to send their transactions.
Q: What exchange has highest volume for ColossusXT, and are there any plans for top exchanges soon ?
A: Currently Cryptopia carries the majority of ColossusXT volume. We are speaking with many different exchanges, and preparing requested documentation for different exchanges. ColossusXT intends to be traded on every major exchange globally.
Q: What is the TPS speed that colx blockchain achieves?
A: ColossusXT achieves between 65-67 TPS depending on network conditions currently.
Q: Plans on expanding the dev team?
A: As development funds allow it, the team will be expanded. Development costs are high for a unique product like ColossusXT, and a good majority of our budget is allocated to it.
Q: Can you explain what is and what are the full porpose of the COLOSSUSXT GRID PROJECT ?
A: Colossus Grid is explained in the whitepaper. The uses for grid computing and storage are vast, and we are only starting to scratch the surface on what this type of computing power can do. There is also a description within the formatting context within the AMA of the Colossus Grid.
Q: Is there mobile wallet for Android and iOS? If not, is there a roadmap?
A: There Android wallet is out of beta and on the Google PlayStore: iOS wallet is planned for development.
The roadmap can be found here: https://colossusxt.io/roadmap/
Q: Is ColossusXT planning on partnering up with other cryptocurrency projects? Such as: Bread and EQUAL.
A: ColossusXT plans on partnering with other crypto projects that make sense. We look for projects that can help alleviate some of our development work / provide quality of life upgrades to our investors so that we can focus on Colossus Grid development. When absolutely love it when the community comes to us with great projects to explore.
Q: Did you ever considered a coinburn? Don't you think a coin burn will increase COLX price and sustain mass adoption? Do you plan on keeping the price of COLX in a range so the potential big investors can invest in a not so much volatile project?
A**:** There are no plans to do a coinburn at this time. Please check out our section in the whitepaper about the supply.
Q: what is the next big exchange for colx to be listed ?
A: There are several exchanges that will be listing ColossusXT soon. Stay tuned for updates within the community as some have already been announced and future announcements.
  1. CryptalDash
  2. NextExchange
  3. CoinPulse
  4. CoinSwitch (Crowdfunding)
  5. Plaak (Crowdfunding)
Q: How will Colx compete with other privacy coins which claim to be better like Privacy?
A: ColossusXT is not competing with other privacy coins. ColossusXT will evolve into the Colossus Grid, which is built on the backbone of a privacy blockchain. In our vision, all these other privacy coins are competing for relevancy with ColossusXT. There are also similar responses to question that may hit on specifics.
Q: Does COLX have a finite number of coins like bitcoin?
A: No, ColossusXT is Proof of Stake. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Proof-of-stake
Q: What are the advantages of COLX over other competitor coins (eg. ECA)?
A: The only similarities between ColossusXT and Electra is that we are both privacy blockchains. ColossusXT is very much an entirely different project that any other privacy coin in the blockchain world today. The Colossus Grid will be a huge advantage over any other privacy coin. Offering the ability for a desktop machine to rent power from others contributing to the Colossus Grid and perform and compute high level tasks.
Q: How do you feel about some countries frowning upon privacy coins and how do you plan to change their minds (and what do you plan to do about it?)
A: The ColossusXT team tries to view opinions from multiple perspectives so that we can understand each line of thinking. As blockchain technology becomes more widely adopted, so will the understanding of the importance of the privacy features within ColossusXT. Privacy is freedom.
Q: How do you see COLX in disrupting cloud gaming services such as PlayStation Now?
A: Cloud gaming services have not been discussed. Initial marketing of our private grid computing framework will be targeted at homes users, governments, and cyber security firms who may require more discretion / anonymity in their work.
Q: Since colx is a privacy coin and is known for its privacy in the transactions due to which lot of money laundering and scams could take place, would colx and its community be affected due to it? And if does then how could we try to prevent it?
A: ColossusXT intends to be known for the Colossus Grid. The Colossus Grid development will be moved up from Q1 2019 to Q3 2018 to reflect this message and prevent further miscommunication about what privacy means for the future of ColossusXT. Previous answers within this AMA may further elaborate on this question.
Q: When do you plan to list your coin on other "bigger" exchanges?
A: ColossusXT is speaking with many different exchanges. These things have many different factors. Exchanges decide on listing dates and we expect to see ColossusXT listed on larger exchanges as we approach the Colossus Grid Beta. The governance system can further assist in funding.
Q: What was the rationale behind naming your coin ColossusXT?
A: Colossus was a set of computers developed by British codebreakers in the years 1943–1945. XT symbolises ‘extended’ as the coin was forked from the original Cv2 coin.
Q: Can you give any details about the E Commerce Marketplace, and its progress?
A: The Ecommerce Marketplace is a project that will receive attention after our development pass on important privacy features for the grid. In general, our roadmap will be changing to put an emphasis on grid development.
Q: How will someone access the grid, and how will you monetize using the grid? Will there be an interface that charges COLX for time on the grid or data usage?
A: The Colossus Grid will be integrated within the ColossusXT wallet. Buying & Selling resources will happen within the wallet interface. You won't be able to charge for "time" on the grid, and have access to unlimited resources. The goal is to have users input what resources they need, and the price they are willing to pay. The Colossus Grid will then look for people selling resources at a value the buyer is willing to pay. Time may come into play based on which resources you are specifically asking for.
Q: Are there any plans to launch an official YouTube channel with instructional videos about basic use of the wallets and features of COLX? Most people are visually set and learn much faster about wallets when actually seeing it happen before they try themselves. This might attract people to ColossusXT and also teach people about basic use of blockchain and cryptocurrency wallets. I ask this because I see a lot of users on Discord and Telegram that are still learning and are asking a lot of real basic questions.
A: ColossusXT has an official YT account with instructional videos: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCCmMLUSK4YoxKvrLoKJnzng
Q: What are the usp's of colx in comparing to other privacy coins?
A: Privacy coins are a dime a dozen. ColossusXT has different end goals than most privacy coins, and this cannot be stated enough. Our goal is not just to be another currency, but to build a sophisticated computing resource sharing architecture on top of the privacy blockchain.
Q: A new exchange will probably gain more liquidity for our coin. If you might choose 3 exchanges to get COLX listed, what would be your top 3?
A: ColossusXT intends to be listed on all major exchanges globally. :)
Q: What is the future of privacy coins? What will be the future colx userbase (beyond the first adopters and enthusiasts)?
A: The future of privacy is the same it has always been. Privacy is something each and everyone person owns, until they give it away to someone else. Who is in control of your privacy? You or another person or entity?The future of the ColossusXT user base will comprise of early adopters, enthusiast, computer science professionals, artificial intelligence, and computational linguistics professionals for which these users can utilize the Colossus Grid a wide range of needs.
Q: Will ColossusXT join more exchanges soon??
A: Yes. :)
Q: So when will Colossus put out lots of advertisement to the various social media sites to get better known? Like Youtube videos etc.
A: As we get closer to a product launch of the Colossus Grid, you’ll begin to see more advertisements, YouTubers, and interviews. We’re looking to also provide some presentations at blockchain conferences in 2018, and 2019.
Q: In your opinion, what are some of the issues holding COLX back from wider adoption? In that vein, what are some of the steps the team is considering to help address those issues?
A: One of the main issues that is holding ColossusXT back from a wider adoption is our endgame is very different from other privacy coins. The Colossus Grid. In order to address this issue, the ColossusXT team intends to have a Colossus Grid Beta out by the end of Q4 and we will move development of the Colossus Grid from Q1 2019 to Q3 2018.
Q: Or to see it from another perspective - what are some of the biggest issues with crypto-currency and how does COLX address those issues?
A: Biggest issue is that cryptocurrency is seen as a means to make quick money, what project is going to get the biggest “pump” of the week, and there is not enough focus on building blockchain technologies that solve problems or creating legitimate business use cases.
For the most part we believe the base of ColossusXT supporters see our end-game, and are willing to provide us with the time and support to complete our vision. The ColossusXT team keeps its head down and keeps pushing forward.
Q: I know it's still early in the development phase but can you give a little insight into what to look forward to regarding In-wallet voting and proposals system for the community? How much power will the community have regarding the direction COLX development takes in the future?
A: The budget and proposal system is detailed in the whitepaper. Masternode owners vote on and guide the development of ColossusXT by voting on proposals put forth by the community and business partners.
Our goal is to make this process as easy and accessible as possible to our community.
Q: Will there be an article explaining the significance of each partnership formed thus far?
A: Yes, the ColossusXT team will announce partners on social media, and community outlets. A detailed article of what partnerships mean will be available on our Medium page: https://medium.com/@colossusxt
Q: What potential output from the Grid is expected and what would it's use be?
For example, x teraflops which could process y solutions to protein folding in z time.
A: There are many uses for grid computing. A crypto enthusiast mining crypto, a cyber security professional cracking a password using brute force, or a scientist producing climate prediction models.
The resources available to put towards grid projects will be determined by the number of nodes sharing resources, and the amount of resources an individual is willing to purchase with COLX.
All individuals will not have access to infinite grid resources.
Q: Is there a paper wallet available?
A: Yes, see https://mycolxwallet.org
Q: Is there a possibility of implementing quantum computer measures in the future?
A: This is a great idea for potentially another project in the future. Currently this is not possible with the Colossus Grid. Instead of bits, which conventional computers use, a quantum computer uses quantum bits—known as qubits. In classical computing, a bit is a single piece of information that can exist in two states – 1 or 0. Quantum computing uses quantum bits, or 'qubits' instead. These are quantum systems with two states. However, unlike a usual bit, they can store much more information than just 1 or 0, because they can exist in any superposition of these values.
Q: Do you plan to do a coin burn?
A: No future coin burns are planned. Anything like this would go through a governance proposal and Masternode owners would vote on this. This is not anything we’ve seen within the community being discussed.
Q: Can I check the exact number of current COLX master node and COLX staking node?
A: Yes. You can view the Masternodes and the amount of ColossusXT (COLX) being staked by viewing the block explorer.
Block explorer: https://chainz.cryptoid.info/colx/#!extraction
Q: What incentive could we give a youtuber to do the BEST video of ColossusXT (COLX)?
A: We've been approached by several YouTubers. The best thing a YouTuber can do is understand what ColossusXT is, join the community, ask questions if there is something they don't understand.
The problem with many YouTubers is that some of them are just trying to get paid, they don't really care to provide context or research a project.
Disclaimer: This is not all YouTubers, but many.
Q: In which ways is the ColossusGrid different from other supercomputer / distributed computing projects out there. Golem comes to mind. Thanks!
A: The main difference is that we are focused on the end users privacy, and the types of users that we will be targeting will be those that need more discretion / anonymity in their work. We are building framework that will continue to push the boundaries of user privacy as it relates to grid computing.
Q: Can we please complete our roadmap ahead of schedule? I find most other coins that do this actually excell in terms of price and community members. Keep on top of the game :)
A: The Colossus XT roadmap is a very fluid document, and it is always evolving. Some items are moved up in priority, and others are moved back. The roadmap should not be thought of something that is set in stone.
Q: Does COLX have master nodes?
A: Yes. ColossusXT has masternodes.
Q: Have thought about providing a method to insert a form of payment in colx in any page that wants to use cryptocurrencies in a fast and simple way in order to masive adoption????
A: There is already this option.https://mycryptocheckout.com/coins/
Q: What do you think your community progress till now?
A: The community has grown greatly in the last 3 months. We’re very excited to go from 13 to 100 questions in our quarterly AMA. Discord, Telegram, and Twitter are growing everyday.
Q: I noticed on Roadmap: Coinomi and ahapeshift wallet integration. Can you tell me more about this? I am new in crypto and new ColX investor so I don't know much about this. Thanks and keep a good work.
A: Coinomi is a universal wallet. ColossusXT will have multiple wallet platforms available to it. Shapeshift allows you to switch one crypto directly for another without the use of a coupler (BTC).
Q: Is "A general-purpose decentralized marketplace" written in the whitepaper the same as "E-COMMERCE MARKETPLACE" written on the roadmap?
Please tell me about "A general-purpose decentralized marketplace" or "E-COMMERCE MARKETPLACE" in detail.
A: Details will be posted as we get closer to the marketplace. It will be similar to other marketplaces within blockchain. Stay tuned for more information by following us on Twitter.
Q: History has shown that feature-based technologies always get replaced by technologies with platforms that incorporate those features; what is colossius big picture?
A: The Colossus Grid. Which has been explained within this AMA in a few different ways.
Q: What are the main objectives for COLX team this year? Provide me 5 reason why COLX will survive in a long term perspective? Do you consider masternodes working in a private easy to setup wallet on a DEX network? Already big fan, have a nice day!
A: Getting into Q3 our main object is to get a working product of the Colossus Grid by the end of Q4.
  1. Community - Our community is growing everyday as knowledge about what we’re building grows. When the Colossus Grid is online we expect expansion to grow at a rapid pace as users connect to share resources.
  2. Team - The ColossusXT team will continue to grow. We are stewards of a great community and an amazing project. Providing a level of support currently unseen in many other projects through Discord. The team cohesion and activity within the community is a standard we intend to set within the blockchain communities.
  3. Features - ColossusXT and The Colossus Grid will have user friendly AI. We understand the difficulties when users first enter blockchain products. The confusion between keys, sending/receiving addresses, and understanding available features within. Guides will always be published for Windows/Mac/Linux with updates so that these features can be easily understood.
  4. Colossus Grid - The Colossus Grid answers real world problems, and provides multiple solutions while also reducing energy consumption.
  5. Use Case - Many of the 1000+ other coins on the market don’t have the current use-case that ColossusXT has, let alone the expansion of utility use-cases in multiple sectors.
Q: Will the whitepaper be available in Portuguese?
A: Yes. We will be adding some language bounties to the website in the future. Stay tuned.
Q: Notice in your white paper there are future plans for decentralised governance and masternode voting. While all that is great, how do you plan on mitigating malicious proposals from getting through by gaming the system (i.e. bot votes, multiple accounts, spam,etc)?
A: You cannot game the system. Masternode owners get 1 vote.
Q: Been a massive fan of this project since Dec last year, anyways what was the reason you guys thought of putting XT at the end of Colossus. :)
A: XT symbolizes ‘extended’ as the coin was forked from the original Cv2 coin.
Q: Do you plan a partnership within the banking industry to capitalize on such large amounts of money being moved continuously?
A: The focus will be on the Colossus Grid and Grid computing, with the option to participate in the financial sector of Blockchain through Polis Pay, and other partnerships that can be announced in the future.
Q: When will be COLX supported By The Ledger Wallet?
A: Integration with cold storage wallet is planned. I myself (PioyPioyPioy) have a Nano Ledger S and I love it!
Q: Where do you see yourself in five years?
A: The goal 5 years from now would be to be a leading competitor in cloud computing and storage. Providing government, private cybersecurity, and individuals with efficient solutions to Super-computing, cloud storage through Blockchain infrastructure. I would like to see hardware options of connecting to the grid to utilize resources after the Colossus Grid is online, and I think this can contribute to many use-case scenarios.
Q: How can I suggest business partnerships and strategic ideas etc to the ColossusXT team?
A: Join us in Discord. Members of the team here are active daily, you can also contact us at: [[email protected]](mailto:[email protected])
Q: A great project requires good funding. How do you plan to incorporate fund sourcing and management into the long-term planning of this project
A: Check out our governance section within the whitepaper. :)
Website: https://colossusxt.io
Whitepaper: https://colossuscoinxt.org/whitepape
Roadmap: https://colossuscoinxt.org/roadmap/
Follow ColossusXT on:
Twitter: https://twitter.com/colossuscoinxt
Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/ColossusCoin/
Telegram: https://web.telegram.org/#/im?p=s1245563208_12241980906364004453
Discord: https://discord.gg/WrnAPcx
Apply to join the team: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1YcOoY6nyCZ6aggJNyMU-Y5me8_gLTHkuDY4SrQPRe-4/viewform?edit_requested=true
Contribute an idea: https://colossusxt.fider.io/
Q2 AMA Questions: https://www.reddit.com/ColossuscoinX/comments/8ppkxf/official_colossusxt_ama_q2/
Previous AMA: https://www.reddit.com/ColossuscoinX/comments/8bia7o/official_colossusxt_ama/
submitted by PioyPioyPioy to ColossuscoinX [link] [comments]

10 Most Dangerous Viruses in Internet History.

Getting a computer virus has happened to many users in some fashion or another. To most, it is simply a mild inconvenience, requiring a cleanup and then installing that antivirus program that you’ve been meaning to install but never got around to. But in other cases, it can be a complete disaster, with your computer turning into a very expensive brick which which no amount of antivirus can protect.
In this list, we will highlight some of the worst and notorious computer viruses that have caused a lot of damage in real life. And since people usually equate general malware like worms and trojan horses as viruses, we’re including them as well. These malware have caused tremendous harm, amounting to billions of dollars and disrupting critical real life infrastructure. Here are the 10 most famous and malicious computer viruses.
Recommended Reading: 10 Signs Your PC Has Been Compromised

1. ILOVEYOU

The ILOVEYOU virus is considered one of the most virulent computer virus ever created and it’s not hard to see why. The virus managed to wreck havoc on computer systems all over the world, causing damages totaling in at an estimateof $10 billion. 10% of the world’s Internet-connected computers were believed to have been infected. It was so bad that governments and large corporations took their mailing system offline to prevent infection.
📷via BBC
The virus was created by two Filipino programers, Reonel Ramones and Onel de Guzman. What it did was use social engineering to get people to click on the attachment; in this case, a love confession. The attachment was actually a script that poses as a TXT file, due to Windows at the time hiding the actual extension of the file. Once clicked, it will send itself to everyone in the user’s mailing list and proceed to overwrite files with itself, making the computer unbootable. The two were never charged, as there were no laws about malware. This led to the enactment of the E-Commerce Law to address the problem.

2. Code Red

Code Red first surfaced on 2001 and was discovered by two eEye Digital Security employees. It was named Code Red because the the pair were drinking Code Red Mountain Dew at the time of discovery. The worm targeted computers with Microsoft IIS web server installed, exploiting a buffer overflow problem in the system. It leaves very little trace on the hard disk as it is able to run entirely on memory, with a size of 3,569 bytes. Once infected, it will proceed to make a hundred copies of itself but due to a bug in the programming, it will duplicate even more and ends up eating a lot of the systems resources.
📷via F-Secure
It will then launch a denial of service attack on several IP address, famous among them the website of the White House. It also allows backdoor access to the server, allowing for remote access to the machine. The most memorable symptom is the message it leaves behind on affected web pages, "Hacked By Chinese!", which has become a meme itself. A patch was later released and it was estimate that it caused $2 billion in lost productivity. A total of 1-2 million servers were affected, which is amazing when you consider there were 6 million IIS servers at the time.

3. Melissa

Named after an exotic dancer from Florida, it was created by David L. Smith in 1999. It started as an infected Word document that was posted up on the alt.sex usenet group, claiming to be a list of passwords for pornographic sites. This got people curious and when it was downloaded and opened, it would trigger the macro inside and unleash its payload. The virus will mail itself to the top 50 people in the user’s email address book and this caused an increase of email traffic, disrupting the email services of governments and corporations. It also sometimes corrupted documents by inserting a Simpsons reference into them.
📷via MSN Canada
Smith was eventually caught when they traced the Word document to him. The file was uploaded using a stolen AOL account and with their help, law enforcement was able to arrest him less than a week since the outbreak began.He cooperated with the FBI in capturing other virus creators, famous among them the creator of the Anna Kournikova virus. For his cooperation, he served only 20 months and paid a fine of $5000 of his 10 year sentence. The virus reportedly caused $80 million in damages.

4. Sasser

A Windows worm first discovered in 2004, it was created by computer science student Sven Jaschan, who also created the Netsky worm. While the payload itself may be seen as simply annoying (it slows down and crashes the computer, while making it hard to reset without cutting the power), the effects were incredibly disruptive, with millions of computers being infected, and important, critical infrastructure affected. The worm took advantage of a buffer overflow vulnerability in Local Security Authority Subsystem Service (LSASS), which controls the security policy of local accounts causing crashes to the computer. It will also use the system resources to propagate itself to other machines through the Internet and infect others automatically.
📷via HP
The effects of the virus were widespread as while the exploit was already patched, many computers haven’t updated. This led to more than a million infections, taking out critical infrastructures, such as airlines, news agencies, public transportation, hospitals, public transport, etc. Overall, the damage was estimated to have cost $18 billion. Jaschen was tried as a minor and received a 21 month suspended sentence.

5. Zeus

Zeus is a Trojan horse made to infect Windows computers so that it will perform various criminal tasks. The most common of these tasks are usually man-in-the-browser keylogging and form grabbing. The majority of computers were infected either through drive-by downloads or phishing scams. First identified in 2009, it managed to compromise thousands of FTP accounts and computers from large multinational corporations and banks such as Amazon, Oracle, Bank of America, Cisco, etc. Controllers of the Zeus botnet used it to steal the login credentials of social network, email and banking accounts.
📷via Abuse.ch
In the US alone, it was estimated that more than 1 million computers were infected, with 25% in the US. The entire operation was sophisticated, involving people from around the world to act as money mules to smuggle and transfer cash to the ringleaders in Eastern Europe. About $70 million were stolen and in possession of the ring. 100 people were arrested in connection of the operation. In late 2010, the creator of Zeus announced his retirement but many experts believe this to be false.

6. Conficker

Also known as Downup or Downadup, Conficker is a worm of unknown authorship for Windows that made its first appearance in 2008. The name comes form the English word, configure and a German pejorative.It infects computers using flaws in the OS to create a botnet. The malware was able to infect more than 9 millions computers all around the world, affecting governments, businesses and individuals. It was one of the largest known worm infections to ever surface causing an estimate damage of $9 billion.
📷via Wikipedia
The worm works by exploiting a network service vulnerability that was present and unpatched in Windows. Once infected, the worm will then reset account lockout policies, block access to Windows update and antivirus sites, turn off certain services and lock out user accounts among many. Then, it proceeds to install software that will turn the computer into a botnet slaveand scareware to scam money off the user. Microsoft later provided a fix and patch with many antivirus vendors providing updates to their definitions.

7. Stuxnet

Believed to have been created by the Israeli Defence Force together with the American Government, Stuxnet is an example of a virus created for the purpose of cyberwarfare, as it was intended to disrupt the nuclear efforts of the Iranians. It was estimated that Stuxnet has managed to ruin one fifth of Iran’s nuclear centrifuges and that nearly 60% of infections were concentrated in Iran.
📷via IEEE
The computer worm was designed to attack industrial Programmable Logic Controllers (PLC), which allows for automation of processes in machinery. It specifically aimed at those created by Siemens and was spread through infected USB drives. If the infected computer didn’t contain Siemens software, it would lay dormant and infect others in a limited fashion as to not give itself away. If the software is there, it will then proceed to alter the speed of the machinery, causing it to tear apart. Siemens eventually found a way to remove the malware from their software.

8. Mydoom

Surfacing in 2004, Mydoom was a worm for Windows that became one of the fastest spreading email worm since ILOVEYOU. The author is unknown and it is believed that the creator was paid to create it since it contains the text message, “andy; I’m just doing my job, nothing personal, sorry,”. It was named by McAfee employee Craig Schmugar, one of the people who had originally discovered it. ‘mydom’ was a line of text in the program’s code (my domain) and sensing this was going to be big, added ‘doom’ into it.
📷via Virus.Wikidot.com
The worm spreads itself by appearing as an email transmission error and contains an attachment of itself. Once executed, it will send itself to email addresses that are in a user’s address book and copies itself to any P2P program’s folder to propagate itself through that network. The payload itself is twofold: first it opens up a backdoor to allow remote access and second it launches a denial of service attack on the controversial SCO Group. It was believed that the worm was created to disrupt SCO due to conflict over ownership of some Linux code. It caused an estimate of $38.5 billion in damages and the worm is still active in some form today.

9. CryptoLocker

CryptoLocker is a form of Trojan horse ransomware targeted at computers running Windows. It uses several methods to spread itself, such as email, and once a computer is infected, it will proceed to encrypt certain files on the hard drive and any mounted storage connected to it with RSA public key cryptography. While it is easy enough to remove the malware from the computer, the files will still remain encrypted. The only way to unlock the files is to pay a ransom by a deadline. If the deadline is not met, the ransom will increase significantly or the decryption keys deleted. The ransom usually amount to $400 in prepaid cash or bitcoin.
📷via Bleepingcomputer.com
The ransom operation was eventually stopped when law enforcement agencies and security companies managed to take control part of the botnet operating CryptoLocker and Zeus. Evgeniy Bogachev, the ring leader, was charged and the encryption keys were released to the affected computers. From data collected from the raid, the number of infections is estimated to be 500,000, with the number of those who paid the ransom to be at 1.3%, amounting to $3 million.

10. Flashback

Though not as damaging as the rest of the malware on this list, this is one of the few Mac malware to have gain notoriety as it showed that Macs are not immune. The Trojan was first discovered in 2011 by antivirus company Intego as a fake Flash install. In its newer incarnation, a user simply needs to have Java enabled (which is likely the majority of us). It propagates itself by using compromised websites containing JavaScript code that will download the payload. Once installed, the Mac becomes part of a botnet of other infected Macs.
📷via CNET
The good news is that if it is infected, it is simply localized to that specific user’s account. The bad news is that more than 600,000 Macs were infected, including 274 Macs in the Cupertino area, the headquarters of Apple. Oracle published a fix for the exploit with Apple releasing an update to remove Flashback from people’s Mac. It is still out in the wild, with an estimate of 22,000 Macs still infected as of 2014.
submitted by bogdan9409 to u/bogdan9409 [link] [comments]

Beginner’s Guide to Exchanges – Part 1

Beginner’s Guide to Exchanges – Part 1

Hola Compadres! It is me u/poop_dragon here with another guide. Today I would like to run through a list of ETH exchanges. This is just Part 1 of this list, and it covers established exchanges. Soon I will post Part 2 and 3 which will go into some other types of exchanges (derivative markets, coin converters, decentralized, and foreign exchanges) Side note, I have given rating to these exchanges based on some comparisons, news, and information which I have found online. Recently, EVERY exchange has been slow/unresponsive in their customer service due to the huge influx of new users. My intention is to help educate new users about the exchanges available. I am not trying to discredit, advertise, pump up, or damage reputations. If you feel something is inaccurate, please respectfully bring it up in the comments. I will be editing as we go. Last thing of note, I have only included the lowest level trading tier to calculate trading fees, which assumes the highest rates. Most exchanges offer lower fees for bigger orders, but I have gone with the assumption that everyone here is not dropping whale amounts of cash.

00 – Concepts and Definitions

01 –Digital Exchanges

Poloniex

Exchange Type Maker Taker
All Currencies .15% .25%
Feature Details
2FA Google Authenticator Available
Wallet Security ‘Majority’ of Funds in cold storage
Personal Information Encrypted and Stored Off-Site
Tier Level Name Email DOB Phone Address Official ID Bank Info KYC Limits
Level 1 X X $2,000 USD Daily Withdrawal Limit
Level 2 X X X X X X $7,000 USD Daily Withdrawal Limit
Level 3 X X X X X X $25,000 USD Daily Withdrawal Limit
Level 4 X X X X X X X X >$25,000 USD Daily Withdrawal Limit
What is a KYC? It stands for Know Your Customer Documentation. This varies between exchanges. However, like most things, if you have to ask, you probably can’t afford it.

Bittrex

Exchange Type Maker Taker
All Currencies .25% .25%
Feature Details
2FA Google Authenticator Available
Wallet Security Multi-stage wallet Majority’ of Funds in cold storage
Personal Information IP Whitelisting restricts trading from new addresses
Tier Level Name Email DOB Phone Address Official ID Bank Info KYC Limits
Basic X X X 3 BTC or less daily
Enhanced X X X X X X 100 BTC or less daily

02– Fiat Exchanges - USA

Coinbase (GDAX)

Country Credit/Debit Linked Bank Account Wire Transfer
Australia 3.99% - -
Canada 3.99% - -
Europe 3.99% 1.49% SEPA- Free (€0.15)
Singapore 3.99% 1.49% -
UK 3.99% - SEPA Free (€0.15)
US 3.99% 1.49% $10 Deposit / $25 With / ACH Free
Exchange Type Maker Taker
ETH/FIAT 0% .30%
ETH/BTC 0% .30%
Tier Level Name Email DOB Phone Address Official ID Bank Info KYC Limits
Level 1 X X X
Level 2 X X X X X Crypto Only
Level 3 X X X X X X X Fiat Enabled
Level 4 X X X X X X X X Higher Fiat Limits
Feature Details
2FA Google Authenticator, Authy, SMS
Wallet Security 98% Assets in Cold Storage
Personal Information 3rd Party Verified, Secured, Stored Offline
Digital Currency Insurance Fully Insured by Lloyd’s of London
Fiat Insurance Up to $250,000 by FDIC
Bug Bounty Multiple bounties up to $10,000

Kraken

Country Linked Bank Account Wire Transfer
EUR Free SEPA €5-10 (€0.09 Withdrawal)
US Free SWIFT $10 ($60 Withdrawal)
UK Free SWIFT £10 (£60 Withdrawal)
CAN Free SWIFT Free ($10 Withdrawal)
Exchange Type Maker Taker
ETH/FIAT .16% .26%
ETH/BTC .16% .26%
Tier Level Name Email DOB Phone Address Official ID Bank Info KYC Limits
Level 0 X No Trading Allowed
Level 1 X X X X No Fiat, Unlimited Crypto
Level 2 X X X X Fiat $2,000Day/$10,000Mo
Level 3 X X X X X X Fiat $25,000Day/$200,000Mo
Level 4 X X X X X X X X Fiat $100,000Day/$500,000Mo
Feature Details
2FA Google Authenticator, Master Key Available
Wallet Security Majority Assets in Cold Storage
Personal Information PGP Encrypted Emails, Global Settings Lock
Digital Currency Insurance Maintain Full Reserves
Bug Bounty Multiple bounties

Gemini

Country Linked Bank Account Wire Transfer
USD Free Free
Exchange Type Maker Taker
ETH/ALL .10-.25% .25%
Tier Level Name Email DOB Phone Address Official ID Bank Info KYC Limits
Individual X X X X X X X None - Except for ACH
Feature Details
2FA Google Authenticator, Authy Available
Hot Wallet Security Hot Wallet Hosted by Amazon Web Services
Cold Wallet Stored in 2 tiers of cold and 'cryo' multi-sig storage
Personal Information Encrypted in Transit and Stored Offline
Digital Currency Insurance Fidelity bond by 'top-tier insurance company'
Fiat Insurance Up to $250,000 by FDIC

03– Fiat Exchanges - Hong Kong

Bitfinex

Country Credit/Debit Bank Transfer Express Bank Transfer
ALL - .1% ($20 Minimum) 1% ($20 Minimum)
Exchange Type Maker Taker
ETH/ALL .10% .20%
Tier Level Name Email DOB Phone Address Official ID Bank Info KYC Limits
Individual X X X X X X (2) X X No Stated Limits
Feature Details
2FA Google Authenticator, Twilio Available
Account Security New IP Addresses locked for 24 hours, require verification and detection
System Security Hosted and Backed-up on Linux, protection from DDoS
Personal Information Email encryption with OpenPGP
Wallet Security Only .5% of funds are stored in hot wallets
EDIT : Thank you to u/Ginger_Bearded_Man for the suggestion. Bittrex has been added.
submitted by poop_dragon to ethtrader [link] [comments]

Proper Care & Feeding of your CryptoLocker Infection: A rundown on what we know.

This article is no longer being maintained, please see the new version here. Thanks.
tl;dr: I hope you have backups. It's legit, it really encrypts. It can jump across mapped network drives and encrypt anything with write access, and infection isn't dependent on being a local admin or UAC state. Most antiviruses do not catch it until the damage is done. The timer is real and your opportunity to pay them goes away when it lapses. You can pay them with a GreenDot MoneyPak or 2 Bitcoins, attempt to restore a previous version using ShadowExplorer, go to a backup, or be SOL.
Vectors: In order of likelihood, the vectors of infection have been:
  • Email attachments: A commonly reported subject is Payroll Report. The attachment, most of the time, is a zip with a PDF inside, which is actually an executable.
  • PCs that are unwitting members of the Zeus botnet have had the virus pushed to them directly.
  • There is currently one report of an infection through Java, using the .jnlp file as a dropper to load the executable.
Variants: The current variant demands $300 via GreenDot MoneyPak or 2 BTC. I will not attempt to thoroughly monitor the price of bitcoins for this thread, use Mt. Gox for the current exchange rate. Currently the MoneyPak is the cheaper option, but last week Bitcoins were. Two variants, including a $100 variant and a $300 that did not offer Bitcoin, are defunct.
Payload: The virus stores a public RSA 2048-bit key in the local registry, and goes to a C&C server for a private key which is never stored. The technical nuts and bolts have been covered by Fabian from Emsisoft here. It will use a mix of RSA 2048-bit and AES 256-bit encryption on files matching these masks:
*.odt, *.ods, *.odp, *.odm, *.odc, *.odb, *.doc, *.docx, *.docm, *.wps, *.xls, *.xlsx, *.xlsm, *.xlsb, *.xlk, *.ppt, *.pptx, *.pptm, *.mdb, *.accdb, *.pst, *.dwg, *.dxf, *.dxg, *.wpd, *.rtf, *.wb2, *.mdf, *.dbf, *.psd, *.pdd, *.eps, *.ai, *.indd, *.cdr, ????????.jpg, ????????.jpe, img_*.jpg, *.dng, *.3fr, *.arw, *.srf, *.sr2, *.bay, *.crw, *.cr2, *.dcr, *.kdc, *.erf, *.mef, *.mrw, *.nef, *.nrw, *.orf, *.raf, *.raw, *.rwl, *.rw2, *.r3d, *.ptx, *.pef, *.srw, *.x3f, *.der, *.cer, *.crt, *.pem, *.pfx, *.p12, *.p7b, *.p7c, *.pdf, *.tif
This list of file masks may be incomplete. Trust this list at your peril. When in doubt, CryptoLocker will show you what files it has encrypted by clicking the relevant link in the virus's message.
It will access mapped network drives that the current user has write access to and encrypt those. It will not attack server shares, only mapped drives. Current reports are unclear as to how much permission is needed for the virus to encrypt a mapped drive, and if you have clarification or can test in a VM please notify me via message.
By the time the notification pops up, it's already encrypted everything. It's silent until the job is done.
Many antiviruses have been reported as not catching the virus until it's too late, including MSE, Trend Micro WFBS, Eset, GFI Vipre, and Kaspersky. They can further complicate matters by reverting registry changes and removing the executables, leaving the files behind without a public or private key. Releasing the files from quarantine does work, as does releasing the registry keys added and downloading another sample of the virus.
Windows XP through 8 have all reported infections.
What's notable about this virus, and this is going to lead to a lot of tough decisions, is that paying them to decrypt the files actually does work, so long as their C&C server is up. They verify the money transfer manually and then push a notification for the infected machine to call home for the private key again, which it uses to decrypt. It takes a long time to decrypt, at the rate of roughly 5GB/hr based on forum reports. The virus uses the registry to maintain a list of files and paths, so not moving the files around is vital to decryption if you are paying them.
Also notable is that the timer it gives you to pay them does appear to be legitimate, as multiple users have reported that once the timer ran out, the program uninstalled itself. Reinfecting the machine does not bring a new timer. I was not able to verify the uninstallation of the program after the timer ran out, it appears to be dependent on internet access.
Due to the nature of the encryption, brute-forcing a decrypt is essentially impossible for now.
Removal: Removing the virus itself is trivial, but no antivirus product (or any product, for that matter), will be able to decrypt the files until the private key is found.
File Recovery: There are only a handful of options for recovering encrypted files, and they all rely on either having System Restore/VSS turned on or having a backup disconnected from the infected machine. Cloud backup solutions without versioning are no good against this as they will commit the encrypted files to the cloud.
I had a Carbonite employee message me regarding my earlier statement that Carbonite is no good against this virus. It turns out that versioning is included in all Carbonite plans and support all agent OSes except Mac OS X which is outside the scope of this thread anyway. They have the ability to do a mass reversion of files, but you must call tech support and upon mentioning CryptoLocker you will be escalated to a tier 3 tech. They do not mention this ability on the site due to the potential for damage a mass reversion could do if done inadvertently. These are my own findings, independent of what the employee told me. Crashplan and other versioning-based backup solutions such as SonicWALL CDP should also work fine provided the backups are running normally.
Using the "Previous Versions" tab of the file properties is a cheap test, and has had mixed results. Using ShadowExplorer on Vista-8 will give you a much easier graphical frontend for restoring large amounts of files at once (though this will not help with mapped drives, you'd need to run it on the server in that case). Undelete software doesn't work as it encrypts the files in place on the hard drive, there is no copying going on. The big takeaway is that cold-storage backups are good, and they will make this whole process laughably easy to resolve.
Prevention: As this post has attracted many home users, I'll put at the top that MalwareBytes Pro, Avast! Free and Avast! Pro (defs 131016-0 16.10.2013 or later) will prevent the virus from running.
For sysadmins in a domain environment, one way to prevent this and many other viruses is to set up software restriction policies (SRPs) to disallow the executing of .exe files from AppData/Roaming. Grinler explains how to set up the policy here.
Visual example. The rule covering %AppData%\*\*.exe is necessary for the current variant. The SRP will apply to domain admins after either the GP timer hits or a reboot, gpupdate /force does not enforce it immediately. There is almost no collateral damage to the SRP. Dropbox and Chrome are not effected. Spotify may be affected, not sure. I don't use it.
Making shares read-only will mitigate the risk of having sensitive data on the server encrypted.
Forecast: The reports of infections have risen from ~1,300 google results for cryptolocker to over 150,000 in a month. This virus is really ugly, really efficient, and really hard to stop until it's too late. It's also very successful in getting people to pay, which funds the creation of a new variant that plugs what few holes have been found. I don't like where this is headed.
Some edits below are now redundant, but many contain useful information.
9/17 EDIT: All 9/17 edits are now covered under Prevention.
10/10 EDIT: Google matches for CryptoLocker are up 40% in the last week, and I'm getting 5-10 new posts a day on this thread, so I thought I'd update it with some interesting finds from fellow Redditors.
  • soulscore reports that setting the BIOS clock back in time added time to his cryptolocker ransom. Confirmed that the timer extends with the machine offline, but that may be cosmetic and I don't like your chances of this actually helping if your timer runs out on the server side.
  • Spinal33 reports that AV companies are catching up with CryptoLocker and are blocking websites that are spawned in the virus's domain generation algorithm. This effectively means that some people are locked out of the ability to even pay the ransom. (Technically they could, but the virus couldn't call home.)
  • Malwarebytes is claiming that MBAM Pro will catch CryptoLocker. If someone wants to test them on it, be my guest. Confirmed
  • CANT_ARGUE_DAT_LOGIC gave some insight on the method the virus uses when choosing what to infect. It simply goes through folders alphabetically and encrypts all files that match the filemasks towards the top of this post. If you are lucky enough to catch it in the act of encrypting and pull the network connection, the CryptoLocker message will pop up immediately and the countdown will begin. Helpful in determining what will need to be taken into account for decryption.
EDIT 2: We had a customer that ignored our warning email get infected so I will have my hands on an infected PC today, hope to have some useful info to bring back.
10/10 MEGA EDIT: I now have an active CryptoLocker specimen on my bench. I want to run down some things I've found:
  • On WinXP at least, the nested SRP rule is necessary to prevent infection. The path rule needs to be %AppData%\*\*.exe
  • An alternate link to the virus sample is http://gktibioivpqbot.net/1002.exe
  • Once the program runs it spawns two more executables with random names in %userprofile%. Adding a SRP to cover %userprofile%\*.exe may be desired, though this will prevent GoToMyPC from running at a bare minimum.
  • This user was a local administrator, and CryptoLocker was able to encrypt files in other user's directories, though it did not spawn the executables anywhere but the user that triggered the infection. When logged in under a different account there is no indication that a timer is running.
  • The environment has server shares but no mapped drives and the shared data was not touched, even though a desktop shortcut would've taken the virus to a share. I suspect that will be covered in the next iteration.
  • The list of masks above does not appear to be totally complete. PDF files were encrypted and were not originally part of the set of file masks. That is the only exception I noticed, everything else follows the list. Conveniently (/s), CryptoLocker has a button you can click that shows the list of files it's encrypted.
  • The current ransom is $300 by MoneyPak or 2BTC, which at the time of writing would be $280 and change.
  • Fabian reported that registry data is stored at HKCU/Software/CryptoLocker. I cannot glean the meaning of the DWORD values on files but I do notice they are unique, likely salts for the individual files. I'm curious what purpose that would serve if the private key was revealed as the salts would be useless.
  • I have confirmed the message soulscore left that setting the BIOS timer back a few hours adds an equal amount of time. No telling whether that will work once it has a network connection and can see the C&C server, though.
  • The virus walked right through an up-to-date version of GFI Vipre. It appears AV companies either consider the risk too low to update definitions or, more likely, they're having trouble creating heuristic patterns that don't cause a lot of collateral damage.
10/11 EDIT: I ran Daphne on the infected PC to get a better idea of what might be going on. lsass.exe is running like crazy. Computer's had it's CPU pegged all day. I noticed the primary executable running from %AppData% has a switch on the end of the run command, which in my case is /w000000EC. No idea what that means.
10/15 EDIT: I just wanted to thank all the redditors that have submitted information on this. I have some interesting new developments that I'll be editing in full tomorrow.
10/18 EDIT: Hello arstechnica! Please read through comments before posting a question as there's a very good chance it's been answered.
New developments since 10/15:
  • We have confirmation that both Malwarebytes Antimalware Pro and Avast Free and Pro will stop CryptoLocker from running. My personal choice of the two is MBAM Pro but research on your own, AV Comparatives is a wonderful resource.
  • We have reports of a new vector of infection, Java. This is hardly surprising as Zeus was already being transmitted in this fashion, but Maybe_Forged reports contracting the virus with a honeypot VM in this manner.
  • zfs_balla made a hell of a first post on reddit, giving us a lot of insight to the behavior of the decryption process, and answered a frequently-asked question. I'm paraphrasing below.
A file encrypted twice and decrypted once is still garbage.
The waiting for payment confirmation screen stayed up for 16 days before a decryption began, so don't lose hope if it's been up a while.
The DWORD values in the registry have no bearing on decryption. Renaming an encrypted file to one on the list in the registry will decrypt it. However, I would presume this would only work for files that the virus encrypted on that machine as the public key is different with every infection.
Adding any new matching files to somewhere the virus has access will cause them to be encrypted, even at the "waiting for payment confirmation" screen. Be careful.
Hitting "Cancel" on a file that can't be found doesn't cancel the entire decryption, just that file.
EDIT 2: I've rewritten the bulk of this post so people don't have to slog through edits for important information.
10/21 EDIT: Two noteworthy edits. One is regarding Carbonite, which is apparently a viable backup option for this, it is covered under File Recovery. The other is regarding a piece of software called CryptoPrevent. I have not tried it, but according to the developer's website it blocks %localappdata%\*.exe and %localappdata%\*\*.exe which is not necessary for the current variant and will inflict quite a bit of collateral damage. I have no reason right now to doubt the legitimacy of the program, but be aware of the tradeoffs going in.
I'm now at the 15000 character limit. Wat do?
submitted by bluesoul to sysadmin [link] [comments]

Grey Areas

I am not a psychopath.
I'm going to be honest I am probably smarter than whoever is reading this post. I do not deny that there are other types of (admirable) intelligence, which most of you probably be very apt in such as "social intelligence." I am talking about the intelligence that matters the most to me: the ability and will to learn.
My whole life I've lied to get out of things and to get what I want. And I am fucking good at it. I've been able to pretty much convince anybody that I didn't do something or that I did do something that I didn't or really anything that I need to.
I'm an anarchist. I am very ethical. As in I follow my own ethical code. Most people would be look down on my specific set of ethics because society has brainwashed them to not accept people just because they are different. People don't have the ability live a little and look outside of the black and white box that society makes us live in.
Most of my teen years have been behind a computer trolling and hacking people behind varies aliases. I've never hacked someone's computer with the intent to blackmail, humiliate, or steal money from them. Although I have thought about it when people have royally pissed me off. I can go into unprovoked rages that last only for a few minutes. I am able to hide this rage in public but not with family--they are not adverse to my spontaneous vicious persecution and sometimes violent outbursts. But I digress...I have no moral qualms with humiliating someone or taking their money if it benefits me in some way. Instead I spend my time on a largely more profitable business model. Last month I grossed 15 million USD in bitcoins from my botnet that runs primarily on linux hosts. I have about 100k bots which I use for mainly fake ad impressions and ddos services. I am serious. Its not like I can go buy a mansion in Beverly hills I can only make small withdrawals from my bitcoin wallet at those bitcoin machines or trade some goth ass neck beard for real money. You probably think I'm making this up but I'm not. I don't have a "grandiose sense of self."
I don't like most people. I enjoy their company if they are charismatic, nice, funny, or have something interesting to talk about, but they could move away and never talk to me again and I wouldn't care. If you asked people who know me how to describe me they would probably call me "the nicest person they know", "funny", "handsome", "smart" etc. Except that I'm not. I'm cold. But I consider myself generally as a good person.
I view most people as software (which is kind of autistic of me I know). I try to find out what makes them "tick" and come up with some kind of primitive psychological profile and figure out how to exploit them. At the most basic level, figure out if they are dumb and then just talk in really complex sentences like some bullshit academics who spend more energy trying to sound smart than get their point across. At some point their eyes will just gloss over and they will start nodding and follow you blindly. It really sounds stupid but just be as cynical as you can and it really works.
I have used this to manipulate people who are complete faggots to get mad enough to fight me without other people realizing that I am the who started it. If you know were someones pressure points are you can do anything. Just push them in the right places so that you aren't really being a dick but you are pushing the right buttons. But I dont think that this is some sadistic tendency of mine rather than just the primal male need to explore their dominance over somebody.
I am not a psychopath because I am empathetic I do care about my family and people close to me, but I wouldn't feel bad if I had to fire someone or making logical decisions such as massive layoffs if it was necessary. Another reason I am not a psychopath is because I am (or used to be) rather neurotic. My whole life I've been plagued by chronic anxiety. It was always something that I've always dealt with (usually with a spliff or addy), but I decided to do something about it and get prescribed an SSRI. And then I got better and live life in a pretty much calm/confident mental state free of anxiety (which is a relief because panic attacks suck ass).
You are probably wondering why I am posting on this sub because I don't believe anything is wrong with me (besides the occasional neurotic episodes or the slight asbergers-like inability to see it someone else's way). Well because grey areas. Robert Hare (the leading psychologist in psychopathy) would probably call me a sociopath. He defines it as someone who has the capacity to feel empathy, but has a set of values that deviate from social norms. I don't like this. I don't like him. I think he is an idiot. I've looked at his diagnostic checklist for psychopathy and its just bad. Its over simplistic and it probably leads to too many diagnosis(es?). By his standards I would be a "semi psychopath"--I scored a 20. On other tests that have been made by psychologists, I scored around mid to late teens, but I take these with a grain of salt(because the internet is not a psychologist) and the fact that I can feel empathy and anxiety disqualifies me from this diagnosis. Sorry back to my point. For Hare to say I'm a sociopath just because I have a different view from society is retarded. By his definition most criminals would be classified as sociopaths. People like to define us by their checklist of symptoms and stuff us in a box labeled 'psycho'. In realty we just live in a grey area. Which is ironic because I think that grey area is where a lot of humanity is defined. Fuck Society (I know I'm a faggot).
I don't know if this annoys anyone else. Everyone's is a bit psychopathic. Me. You. Well obviously your are. I don't know if you live by your own set of ethics or how you even set that, but it would be interesting to know what your ethics are or if you have any limits or there is something your wouldn't do.
EDIT: spelling
submitted by cyber-psycho to sociopath [link] [comments]

Conversations with a Dev, Insight into the workings behind our coin.

This is a copy of a discussion I had with one of the dogecoin Devs, I think it is an important read as the original post dissapeared of the front page pretty quick, it was, enlightening.
[–]rnicollReference client dev 8 points 23 hours ago We need a stable reference client whatever we do next. 1.7 will be that client, but we need more testing. We'll hopefully have a beta release in the next few days, but until they any testing on the alpha release would be greatly appreciated: http://www.reddit.com/dogecoin/comments/224vix/dogecoin_17_alpha_1_such_test_wow_much_feedback/ That out of the way; a coin derives value through utility. To make a coin useful, it must be accepted. For it be accepted, merchants must see acceptance as a cost-effective option. One of the issues they're going to wonder about, to my mind, is software stability. We keep having major updates which fork the blockchain or have problems with the RPC daemon. 1.7 is our solution to that; a massively improved client based on the Bitcoin 0.9 client, with a far more in depth testing period than previous releases. It means we're leaping to the front of the altcoins in technical basis, and providing a rock solid foundation for adoption. Meanwhile, we have documentation projects ongoing in security and standards both to further aide adoption, and to enable alternative implementations. Edit: Going to bed, not ignoring any replies, but unlikely to get back to you until after work tomorrow. permalinksavereportgive goldreply
[–]Master565[S] 1 point 16 hours ago That sounds great! I wish I could help you test, but I'm on the wrong computer in the wrong country right now.
[–]junkyardmessiah 6 points 23 hours ago All things being equal however , as a Dev , do you see a problem is the current Sfire situation , 25gh is pointed at us and he is dumping mass quantities of Doge into the wafflepool for BTC using his asic farm. Last count it was over 1.1 billion coins in the past week alone. I can pull up the graphs, But I think you already know about this. Initial acceptance by merchants is not going to consist of true believers of the 1 doge = 1 doge principal . If you look at BTC and Tiger direct , pricing directly matches BTC = fiat. So any principle based on the idea that merchants are going to look to anything but what the coin can be turned into as an aspect of Fiat is ... silly, I knwo the mantra of 1doge = 1 doge sounds nice , but untill we have inter business trading of the currency between them. 1 doge is going to be worth .0003 cents
[–]rnicollReference client dev 4 points 22 hours ago Painfully aware of SFire. Honestly, I'm more worried about the continual drops in BTC/USD pricing. If you follow the price closely, we get further hammered down when BTC dips, so we're getting double the pain. We're losing ground to BTC, and that's not great, but that's about 10% of the total drop we're seeing. I can't do much for BTC though, so lets get back to mining. Okay; merged mining won't fix the price, as far as I can tell. We'd about break-even (I reckon) vs LTC miners dumping DOGE, vs DOGE miners dumping LTC. It would probably massively reduce risk of a 51% attack, but that's all. For that, we take on the risk of any major problems with LTC will also hit us, and as we expand over time it becomes harder to "de-merge" later. Lastly, it would likely trash many of our mining pools, who would be too small to find any blocks, vs LTC miners. Moving to a CPU mining algorithm would probably just hand us to botnets, instead of ASIC farms. I've seen this before, certainly. So lets say we decide to move to a GPU mining algorithm of one sort or another. We still need a stable client we know we can modify, and people report problems with 1.6, so we have to get 1.7 done first. Hence we need testing of 1.7. We then implement a new PoW, and at some point branch. Presuming we don't have any unexpected problems with the branch, or introduce any critical bugs while editing core parts of the code, we make it harder to copy to/from DOGE mining, but if we're still the most profitable coin, people will still mine us (although with GPU farms rather than ASIC). We also inherently accept the environmental cost of all that GPU power. Oh, and we have to remain hopeful that no bright pure maths PhD student finds a way of optimising the hashing algorithm which gives them a huge performance boost over everyone else (essentially acting as a software ASIC). In summary; we're getting to the end of the development period for 1.7 and looking at 1.8 will do, but no answer that's been proposed is clearly superior to all others.
[–]junkyardmessiah 1 point 18 hours ago Well I do thank you for the response, Just I really hope we can move towards an answer abit faster. right now we are in the sub 80's and still dropping in value. I think the fact we are tied to BTC as our peg is another thing that is killing us . we need to be tied directly to Fiat if we stand a chance. I'd rather not have our currency tied to possible future Mt GOX events. it really needs to stand on its own, But again value right now is reflected in fiat. This is a bad situation all the way around . But here is the question . is there ANYTHING the community can do to stop this falling value and turn it around, from the obvious. I have bought all of the coin I can right now and am mining my ass off. I am accepting the coin at my business on small items right now but need to pay rent and they don't take Doge. ... yet I don't want the coin so I can just dump it like Sfire does for BTC/Fiat. Is there a crucial thing each of us can do to change the current stalemate of the deflationary machine that is Waffle or multipools?. Where do we toss our Sabots into the gears of our destruction? I am my wits end , all I can see as a clear winner might be that we need a mixed POW/POS algo with 25% Scrypt, 25% Scrypt-n or scrypt jane, 25% CPU, 25% POS. If such a thing were a possible fix . and the devs need money to develop it, .. will you take a check?
permalinksaveparenteditdeletereply [–]rnicollReference client dev 1 point 11 hours ago runs back to the thread, out of breath Sorry, so many posts, keep losing track. Well, good news to start with, we apparently just jumped back up again. Praying this isn't a dead cat bounce (seriously, that's a term, I'm not making this up). Hoping other devs will chip in on suggestions; my background is trading-heavy, so I'm mostly thinking about things such as whether we can get UPS to accept Dogecoin (so merchants pay shipping costs in Dogecoin without exchanging through). I'm also wondering about seeing if we can pay taxes in Dogecoin, because I know HMRC takes debit cards, and if Dogecoin is cheaper to accept why not... We've also just had a working implementation of merged mining for Litecoin submitted to Github, which I imagine will be the major topic of discussion over the weekend, as obviously it reduces the work for that route by a lot. If anyone has the technical skills, a P2P multipool would be a way of avoiding Wafflepool scenarios by enabling those who want to make immediate profit to hop target without centralising their mining. This is where someone tells me we have one already, of course... Oh, also, you know we're 14 days (give or take) from halvening? So SFire's rewards will halve on the 25th (again, give or take a bit), along with everyone else's? permalinksaveparentreportgive goldreply
[–]junkyardmessiah 1 point 6 hours ago Well I can hope things will be better by the next halvening But I suspect the percentage of low level miners will drop off since it just won't be worth it anymore. I suspect that regardless of the halvening his percentage of the % total coins mined will be the same. But there is a rumor that with the profits hes made so far that his goal is 50gh. and he has done some testing https://pools.rapidhash.net/pool/5 As for the sudden jump , A whale bought 101 million last night for his attempt to a pump and dump. I am not expecting much. So lets break it down, it is a simple question , What at present is off the table or is just undoable in time to bring our value up by the 10k block rewards. and what CAN be done by the devs. to me there there is only one thing that will guarantee a price boost and keep people mining. Drop the 5 billion deflationary yearly to 1.5 % or drop it completely, if the coin is too cheap and we cannot keep miners on it it is dead. simple enough. permalinksaveparenteditdeletereply
[–]rnicollReference client dev 1 point 4 hours ago Off the table? Well, we're not going to merge-mine with BTC, fairly certain of that at least! For 25th (halvening); probably most things would need more time, but most changes we could have in testing and potentially released ready for a higher block number, by then. Changing block rewards would need overwhelming support from the community to do. Honestly, I think people would call for our heads if we tried it. Notably, last halvening the price did nearly double in the week or two beforehand. That's part of why we're mostly favouring doing nothing; historically actually things look bad, but do get better. You can also dig into Bitcoin's history for examples of this. Interestingly, someone just submitted a patch for Litecoin merged mining. I'd definitely not want to be the one to make a call that we know will crush whole mining pools, but it means the option's there if it gained real support. As to changing PoW - I'm going to be talking contingencies with other devs tonight, see what we can come up between us. Again, there's mostly concern that if this goes wrong, we can do a lot more damage to the coin than SFire and a halvening is doing... permalinksaveparentreportgive goldreply
[–]junkyardmessiah 1 point 2 hours ago Thank you for being frank and honest with us , Let the other Devs Know a weekly update on the front page would be really really helpful for bolstering confidence that there is actual direction to the madness that is Dogecoin A big question here is how do we gauge support? It is all over the place, voting system would be nice. with some protections against bots and nobody can vote with an account younger the 5 days from the time of the vote would be good too. Debate could be held on reddit , voting on on dogcoin.com I think a lot of angst and worry is due to the feeling of not "really " having control of the destiny of dogecoin. That it is up to the devs to make decisions on the smattering of posts that are scattered all over this sub. We need a cohesive way to express our opinions . If you make the reasoned case for block reward changes , you might be surprised by the reaction you get. Please put it to the others that if we could have more interaction and more regular updates it would go well for all of us and inspire confidence . which can also help bring our value up. permalinksaveparenteditdeletereply
[–]rnicollReference client dev 1 point 1 hour ago It's worth keeping in mind we're still just assembling organisational structure. Clients up to 1.5 inclusive were led by the founders, 1.6 was lleti and rog1121, and 1.7 is now leofidus, langerhans and myself. So; we're working on communication with you guys, as soon as we've got it sorted amongst ourselves :) Attempts so far to have go-betweens assist us with communication have given an impression of an isolated elite, so yeah, it's a work in progress. Anyway; yes, there's predictably been extended and expressive discussion for several hours, and we think we've got a least bad solution. I'm getting everyone involved to confirm they're happy with the idea in principal, but it looks like we're going to try beating the multipools at their own game, by building a better multipool which is less hostile to DOGE. That's as much as is concrete so far, I can literally see the conversation progressing in another window, and the other two core devs are both offline anyway. I definitely want to see if I can get a weekly "What we've done, what we've learnt, what we've thought about but didn't do, what you can do to help" blog post or similar, and I may get the first done this weekend (if not, next). There is a hell of a lot happening (for example implementing the Bitcoin payment protocol for Doge, security whitepapers, writing formal specifications to go to the IETF) that people don't see... permalinksaveparentreportgive goldreply
[–]junkyardmessiah 1 point 57 minutes ago Okay that is at least something. It is like trying to pull back the curtain of the wizards of doge only to see them scrambling like mad pulling levers and pushing buttons/ I would like to post this discussion we have had in a new post to get it some more visibility if you would be okay with that. I really do hope the next Halvening will show some results. But I think most expected a lot more out of the last one. I think all of us would like to hear about the "least bad" solution, and what it means for the coin.
[–]rnicollReference client dev [score hidden] 43 minutes ago* If you want to see us at work, the #dogecoin-dev channel on Freenode's an excellent idea. I'm there if I'm working, and the other two currently active devs are frequently around too. It's... well, busy, and I can't guarantee you'll see stuff that interests you, but it does let you see what's going on. As to a new post; I'm unfussed. Anything I'm posting I presume I'll come back to discover a few thousand shibes have spotted and suddenly read. That said, because weekends are when I can get my head down and make progress, I'll be less chatty on reddit, fair warning. At the moment everyone in the room seems reasonably happy that the best thing to do is to provide better mining software to pull people such as SFire away from single pools. I think there's also the intent to have the pools generate DOGE by default instead of BTC, but even if that's not something people could work with, we can at least implement much better trading algorithms (that's well within my skillset). That said, others are taking the lead there, I'm going to be focusing on technical documentation; a security specialist is working on guidelines for using cryptocurrency safely (for merchants and similar) with some guidance from myself, and I'm hoping to make a start on formal documentation as soon as the Bitcoin payment protocol stuff is done.
submitted by junkyardmessiah to dogecoin [link] [comments]

Dump of ourchain.slack.com #de-central-station March 22 - April 8

(Answering Gary from https://ourchain.slack.com/archives/C3E31N9BP/p1490197255589333) Without anonymity you are giving more power to the existing powelegal structure. Bitcoin was designed to protect wealth from hackers, regulators, and incompetent managers. There are three types of cryptostate based on the level of anonymity. In the publicstate there is no anonymity, your "bodynyms" are associated with your "cryptonyms" for example when photos/video of you or your location are on a network that anyone can access. In the trustedstate this info is trusted to service providers like an ISP or social networks like Slack, Wikipedia, Reddit, etc. In the privatestate your identity is mixed with enough (lawful) users that it is unfeasible for regulators, hackers, and managers to control you. The privatestate is generally theoretical. It is very difficult to know for certain how this info could leak. The Tor network provides privacy from some but not necessarily the most powerful surveillance (or) those running the network, so this may be considered part of the trustedstate (assuming you don't leak a lot of personal info like me) or it could be part of the privatestate. Botnets may provide better anonymity though it isn't very nice. otomplodomo https://ourchain.slack.com/archives/rhoc/p1490110417643667 Doesn't freedom require a foundation of equality? Posted in #rhocMarch 22nd at 3:40 PM (edited) rilly 7:07 PM Any of these cryptostates change the game and offer opportunities from new power structures. Payment processors cannot simply block blockchain transactions in the public/trustedstate but regulators can still outlaw them. 7:11 This is the primary threat that blockchain advocates should be concerned about. They aren't likely to attack the blockchain (yet) they are moving to de-anonymize everyone. As the internet offers a far more efficient way of moving information, and people often (used to) commute only to move information). this gives them a level of control not see in human history. Straigh outa 1984! (edited) rilly 7:23 PM Anonymity is among the most difficult features to have it you also need security. Cryptonomic networks have to provide incentives to being part of mixes probably by issuing tokens to reward those who mix. rilly 7:34 PM I understand many/most laws are generally benevolent and I do not advocate "crypto anarchy" as in enabling markets for (sex) slaves, assassination, etc. Once the genie of a creditclaim market that can produce revolutionary infoGoods such as strong anonymity software, is out of the bottle we might regret this. While I tend to be more concerned about alternatives to "involuntary"/"unrepresentative" taxes, or the crime of outlawing vicimless crimes, I don't really know what I would be doing if I were aware of all the victim-crime. otomplodomo 7:36 PM I consider the freedom to say anything I want publicly,barring "fire" in a crowded theatre, more valuable than the right to say it in private. Sane people don't surveil. Those who do are rarely intelligent enough to understand what they are surveilling. rilly 7:38 PM Thus we need a way for an (autonomous) cryptostate to regulate itself. My solutions are "selective mixing" and the cryptocourt. Taxes are a "necessary" way of funding non-excludable goods like information goods or common goods such as the oceans and atmosphere. 7:42 @otomplodomo yes but I'd say "censorship" is the most important form of speech. We have to be able to filter out 99.99999999999% of what people want us to heasee so that we can focus on what is important. We don't have the right to force others to hear us or to flood a network with messages of what we believe to be important. 7:44 So we really need a system that can promote good ideas to those who need them or who can put them to use. otomplodomo 7:44 PM Censorship can happen between equals? rilly 7:45 PM Just telling people about threats can drive them to self-destruction if they can't do anything about it. 7:47 @otomplodomo This started with the convo about KYC. I suspect you are trying to rationalize this because you have no choice with the type of organization Greg wants to create in Washington. I'm warming to the idea. 7:47 Being a cyborg is difficult. 7:50 But eventually, after more software exists, I think a more appropriate bases for a global currency is one that promotes equality through anonymity. 7:54 I mean, this team requires a large amount of funding. Who is going to give you that without expecting more funding in return? 7:56 KYC is something the powerful require of you. 8:00 They want to extort taxes, enforce their financial oligopolies, etc. They might prevent victim crimes or this might reduce the powewealth going to certain types of criminal, so in that sense it is good, but not revolutionary or as revolutionary as a new economic system. There is another question here of whether yall are going to keep tricking your customers as with the last Synereo fundraiser. jimscarver 1:36 PM The legal requirement for KYC can be achieved by having identity that is provable but not revealed except to the authority in the event that a subpoena is issued for a specific account. An identity proof may be encrypted using a public key of an authority and the private key of the merchant such that the identity is not revealed to anyone except when required by law.Strong pseudo anonymous identity may be developed from within your webs of trust revealing only the necessary factors without specific personally identifying information such as having a mailing address or citizenship in a certain country, being over 21 years old, owning a home, not being a robot, etc.For any kind of democratic process unique identity must also be established which is a much more difficult process. Device, location, biometric, and state identification can be used to determine a probability of uniqueness in a set of participants without revealing the specific attributes of the individuals to others using homeomorthic encryption techniques. rilly 7:02 PM @jimscarver The debate about why it is right and proper to have central authorities deciding who is innocent or guilty, seems a bit off-topic for the "de-central-station". This channel is for those who believe in decentralized networks. An interesting subject none the less, I created #a-noobs-law-firm for discussions such as these. (edited) jimscarver 8:26 PM perhaps you would like to hold a #de-central-station panel @rilly as we started doing to replace the synereo fireside chat rilly 10:36 PM What would this require of me? 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